Category Archives: History

Welcome, #histfic #author Joyce Shaughnessy, the #RRBCSpotlightAuthor for July!

Today we welcome Joyce Shaughnessy on Day 3 of her RRBC Spotlight Author blog tour!

Joyce

Indie Publishing

I have always self-published. I now have published five books. Barnes & Nobles won’t sell self-published books except for e-books on their website. I have become discouraged about that aspect of self-publishing. Of course, it doesn’t make any difference when asking for other chances at a book signing locally. There are many local merchants who are willing to sponsor a signing. And there is RRBC, which does more for promoting Indie authors, than anyone I have ever seen. It does more than the services who charge for advertising. And it is a great place to meet other authors!

A HEALING PLACE

A Healing Place is a story based in the 1930’s and 40’s, which emphasizes the power of love, sacrifice, courage, and prayer. The Milller family, Amos, Molly, and 3 daughters live the hardships of the Great Depression, moving finally to Texon, Texas. It was their healing place.

Then their son-in-law was caught in the Philippines during World War II where he had to walk the brutal “Bataan Death March.” Their examples of bravery in the face of the brutality of the war exist today, in the men and women who are put in “harm’s way.” It is through their sacrifices that we are able to enjoy the freedom that this country affords us.

The son-in-law found his healing place through the power of prayer when he was in the Death March and enemy camps.

This book was one of five Xlibris books that was chosen to be showcased at the World’s largest Book Fair in Frankfurt, Germany.

Watch the book trailer: https://youtu.be/6jZOdJhRw94

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Joyce Shaughnessy has published five books in the last seventeen years. The first three, A Healing Place, Blessed Are the Merciful, and The Unsurrendered, are romantic historical fiction based upon the Dust Bowl in the Great Depression and WWII in the Pacific. They reflect her love of history and historical fiction. She is also a certified editor, and has edited four anthologies and several novels. She loves editing almost as much as writing. She has two finished manuscripts on her desk. She hasn’t found the proper home for them yet, but will hopefully soon. She has lived with her husband in Midland, Texas for the last twenty-six years. They share a love of reading and own a very large collection gathered over the years.

 

Connect with Joyce online:

Joyce’s blog: http://joyceshaughnessy.blogspot.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/AuthorJoyceS

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JoyceShaughnessyAuthor/

 

 

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#RRBCSpotlightAuthor for July – Joyce Shaughnessy #RRBC #historicalfiction

AHealingPlace

MarethMB

Welcome to SPOTLIGHT Author’s Blog Tour, its first stop, here on my blog. Congratulations Joyce Shaughnessy! I’m happy and excited to be the first to host Joyce Shaughnessy, our Rave Reviews Book Club SPOTLIGHT Author for July. I’m sure that many of you would love to get to know Joyce and her work better. You’ll enjoy the experience very much!

Joyce Shaughnessy

Over to you Joyce:

When I Decided to Write a Book

I was watching a history channel production of “The American Dust Bowl.” It particularly interested me because I live in West Texas which is definitely a barren and dusty place. I remembered my parents telling stories about the time in the Twenties and Thirties when they lived on a family farm. Their stories were exactly what TV shows had portrayed. I was a literature major and had constantly read, so I was familiar with historical fiction literature. It was…

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Drop Dead Gorgeous: 19th Century #BeautyTips for the Aspiring Consumptive @DrtySexyHistory

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“Although having an active (rather than latent) case of consumption was all but a death sentence, it didn’t inspire the revulsion of other less attractive diseases until the end of the 19th century when its causes were better understood.”

Dirty, Sexy History

swoonPicture the ideal nineteenth century English beauty: pale, almost translucent skin, rosy cheeks, crimson lips, white teeth, and sparkling eyes. She’s waspishly thin with elegant collarbones. Perhaps she’s prone to fainting.

It shouldn’t be difficult to imagine; numerous depictions survive to this day, and the image is still held up as the gold standard for Caucasian women. At this point, it’s so embedded in the Western psyche as beauty that it doesn’t occur to us to question it. Of course that’s beautiful. Why wouldn’t it be?

By the nineteenth century, beauty standards in Britain had come a long way from the plucked hairlines of the late Middle Ages and the heavy ceruse of the Stuart period. Fashionable women wanted slimmer figures because physical fragility had become associated with intelligence and refinement. Flushed cheeks, bright eyes, and red lips had always been popular, particularly among sex workers (they suggested arousal), and women…

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#Belthane blessings for this 2018 Walpurgisnacht #MayDay #Witches

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Laura Libricz, Authoress

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What comes to your mind when someone mentions the 8th century? Could it be the introduction of the triangle harp by the Picts in Scotland? Or maybe the reign of Charlemagne, King of the Franks. Or the popular epic poem Beowulf, which could be as old as the 8th Century? Or marauding Vikings invading the coasts of Europe? Or of the Bendedictine nun and English missionary to the Frankish Empire Walburga, later to be canonized on May 1, 870, one hundred years after her death?

St. Walburga was born in Devonshire in 710. She was raised in a Benedictine Abbey during the time her father and brothers travelled as pilgrims to far-away holy lands. After twenty-six years in the abbey, she joined her brother St. Boniface in Germany to help with his missionary work there.

The goal was to strip the Germanic tribes of any pagan tendencies that might still…

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Discover #RRBC author Laura Libricz in this interview with @DianneAscroft @HFVBT THE SOLDIER’S RETURN blog tour

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Today, I’m over at Dianne Ascroft’s blog for an interview! Read more here:

Today I’ve invited Laura Libricz, author of The Soldier’s Return, the second book in the Heaven’s Pond trilogy to Ascroft, eh? to tell us about her latest novel.

Welcome Laura.

Thank you so much for having me over today, Dianne!

Let’s get started, shall we?

Tell us about your novel.

LL: The Heaven’s Pond Series is a three-part historical series set in Franconia, Germany, in the early 17thThe Soldier's Return covercentury during the Thirty Years War. These are the novels I have always wanted to read. Written in English and taking the German viewpoint of the war, the story is told by a young maid, a patrician, a Jesuit priest and a young Dutchman. The Master and the Maid is the first book in the series and begins the story in 1616. It’s about a young woman who loses her home, her job and her freedom. Harboring…

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Read LuAnn’s #review for #histfic novel THE SOLDIER’S RETURN @KentuckyGal @HFVBT

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Today I’d like to welcome LuAnn Braley and share her wonderful review of THE SOLDIER’S RETURN! Please take the time to visit her at Back Porchervations.

LuAnn’s Review:

The second book in Laura Libricz’s “Heaven’s Pond Trilogy”, The Soldier’s Return, pulls no punches when it comes to describing some of the more horrifying aspects of war in the early 1600s.  Granted, there were no air strikes or nukes, but plenty of damage was done to the countryside and the people living there nonetheless.

The whole Catholic vs Protestant issue was cooking on high heat and littlle bits of land would go back and forth from the control of one religion to the control of another.  And wo to the Catholic who found herself in a Protestant village, and vice versa.  It was as bad back then as it is these days between gangs in many areas.  And interactions could be just as deadly.

And Ralf, the Jesuit whom I grew to dislike intensely in the first book of the trilogy, The Master and the Maid, doubled down on his fanaticism when it came to ferreting out ‘witches’, which a rather disproportionate amount of the time were Protestant sympathizers.  If the suspect in question did not give an answer that Ralf wanted, he would apply various ‘methods of persuasion’ to ‘drive the devil out’ of said person.  I remember a vivid description of thumb screws…and he just got nasty from there.

Herr Tucher and Katarina (the titular master and maid of the first book) were still at Sichardtshof farm, trying to hold things together for the little group of people living and working there.  Not an easy job when army after army comes through.  In those times, the soldiers were not paid their promised wages very often, and scant if any rations were provided, so they took what they wanted from farmers and villagers – food, drink and women.  I am glad the author did not resort to the crass terminology that seems to be prevalent in some modern erotic romances, but the scenes are quite disturbing nonetheless.  That is not a criticixm, but an observation.

Pieter had gone back to Amsterdam shortly before his father passed away, ran into all kinds of trouble shortly after and after a stint in jail in the Spice Islands, returned but had to leave town fairly quickly again.  He wanted to go back to the farm (probably the closest thing to family he had left), and joined up with various military units on the way south to Sichardtshof.  He changed units as often as needed to suit his purposes.  Unfortunately, he did not resign or ask for re-assignment first…which tends to upset the commanders of said units.  Deserters faired no better, and probably much worse, than they do today.

Reading the book, which was difficult to stop, I felt like I was there – slogging through mud, feeling fear for the women and children on the farm when soldiers and ‘camp followers’ marauded through.

I do wonder about the title, a wee bit.  The story seemed to have as much or more to do with the goings on at Sichardtshof itself, than with Pieter’s return to the farm.  For me it’s one of those ‘it would be interesting to know someday’, but had no bearing on my enjoyment of the book.

The Soldier’s Return is not always an easy read.  Don’t get me wrong, the story is wonderful … but life for the people living in that area and at that time was not..  There was not a ‘HEA’ ending, but the core group of characters (Tucher, Katarina, Isobel, her father and Pieter) were still standing.  If you are a reader, The Soldier’s Return is a satisfying, filling read.

And now I’m really looking forward to the last installment of the trilogy, Ash and Rubble, to see how Isobel fulfills the White Witch’s predictions for her!

Join me on this stop of my @HFVBT #book tour for the latest review of #histfic The Soldier’s Return

Please join me today in welcoming Rachael from Rachael’s Ramblings for this wonderful review!

“One thing I felt Laura Libricz did superlatively was create a gritty sense of realism. This is war and religion at their least glorious; there are no great victories or dashing heroes to be found here. Throughout the novel she explores how very low mankind can sink in its darkest times and how brutal people can be with very little provocation, especially to people they consider ‘other’.”

Continue reading here:

Rachael's Ramblings

This was meant to be up much earlier in the week, but life got somewhat in the way! I was kindly sent this book by Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours.

The Soldier’s Return by Laura Libricz

Publication Date: September 15, 2017
eBook & Paperback

Series: Heaven’s Pond Trilogy, Book Two
Genre: Historical Fiction

The year is 1626. A senseless war rips through parts of Germany. Ongoing animosity between the Catholics and the Protestants has turned into an excuse to destroy much of the landscape situated between France, Italy and Denmark. But religion only plays a minor role in this lucrative business of war.

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