Category Archives: Books

Laura Libricz – #RRBC “SPOTLIGHT” Author Blog Tour Day 7

MarethMB

I’m so happy to have Laura Libricz as my guest today.  As you can see, I’m encouraging you to linger longer, savouring a cup of espresso from Umbria, Italy and enjoy the lovely roses carefully selected for you by a special little girl!

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Someone special with pink roses

This is Laura’s seventh and final day of her RRBC SPOTLIGHT Author Blog Tour.  By now, many of you have got to know her better and if you like historical fiction, you’ll definitely be intrigued by her well-researched first book, THE MASTER AND THE MAID which has a setting in 17th century Germany. Please feel free to comment beyond the ABOUT ME section and don’t forget to answer Laura’s question!

Laura says: “Welcome to Day 7, the final day of my #RRBC “SPOTLIGHT” Author Blog Tour. This has been a blast and I’d like to thank everyone who stopped by, especially my hosts and the RRBC. Here’s a…

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With much joy, I introduce Laura Libricz, #RRBC’s “Spotlight” Author!

Natalie Ducey

I am thrilled to welcome Laura Libricz, Rave Reviews Book Club “Spotlight” Author, on today’s stop of her blog tour.  Laura is an amazing, supportive member of RRBC who generously promotes fellow authors. I consider it an honour to shine the “Spotlight” on her today.

With much joy, I introduce Laura Libricz!

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Welcome to Day 1 of my #RRBC “SPOTLIGHT” Author Blog Tour. I’d like to thank my host and the RRBC for this great honor. To kick off this blog tour, I’d like to talk about writing!

Everything that happens in my writing happens for a reason! Just like that moment while watching a B-rated horror flick on TV. The heroine hears spooky sounds coming out of the basement. The music rises and her footsteps slow as she walks towards the basement door. Her hand reaches for the knob and everyone in the room shouts, “Don’t do it!”

We wonder how she could be so…

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#booktrailer The Soldier’s Return #RRBC

Watch the trailer for historical fiction novel The Soldier’s Return:

 

A senseless war rips through parts of Germany. Ongoing animosity between the Catholics and the Protestants has turned into an excuse to destroy much of the landscape in the territories situated between France, Italy and Denmark. But reliSoldiersReturn 700kgion only plays a minor role in this very lucrative business of war. What better way to wage war than with underpaid, starving, sick, desperate mercenary soldiers?

Direct in the path of these marauding mercenaries lies the once-idyllic farm called Sichardtshof. The master and the maid have lived here the last ten years in a semblance of peace but teetering on the edge of destruction. The attacks are more frequent and the soldiers are more brutal than before. With the soldiers come disease, the plague. And Franconia has found scapegoats to blame for all this misfortune. Witch hunts and executions are more prevalent than ever.

The Soldier’s Return, Book 2 in the Heaven’s Pond trilogy, revisits Katarina and Isabeau and their journey of survival in the lawless German countryside of the early 17th century.

To be released in September 2017

RECONSTRUCTING HISTORY #MondayBlogs

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THE THIRTY YEARS WAR

Judging by the images and the books that are popular today, can you imagine how someone 400 years from now will view our society? How will they reconstruct our day in age based on the records we leave behind? That is, if they can even access our information. What impressions will they have of our culture?

I take this into consideration as I research and write my 17th century historical novels. I have a good idea of what the time period looked like from paintings like those from the Dutch Golden Age. Objects and artifacts that survived the passing of time help illustrate how people lived their daily lives. But what people thought, what they felt, can only be taken from the work of those who wrote down their experiences. Even then, we only get the point of view of individuals with a certain standing in the community. We are subject to see history based on their beliefs and more importantly, what they wanted the reader to believe.

So, as I reconstruct the Thirty Years War and the impact the war had on the Aisch Valley in Franconia, Germany, I choose sources that give me a more realistic version of the world I am recreating. These include local historical almanacs, autobiographical accounts that survived over the years and current research of the Early Modern Period. I’d like to tell you about my most important ones.

The Thirty Years War was considered The Great War by the Germans up until WWI. The devastation it left behind was up until that time unmatched. The population was reduced by a third, some believe by half. Great tracks of land were left untouched by the war but other areas were set back 100 years in their development. Some of the villages in my area died out completely for more than two generations. And a surprising number of events that transpired there were written down and collected.

Germans call them Heimatbücher; village historical almanacs, written by local residents, village officials and clergy. Many small communities have them. Full of church records, local weather chronicles, tax records, marriage, birth and death registers, maps and photographs, you’ll find one on almost every bookshelf in Germany. They recorded everything from the Hussiten Wars to the Little Ice Age, the natural catastrophe believed to help fuel the Thirty Years War. Many of the troop movements that stain Germany’s war-torn history and the damage left behind can be found in these books. They tend to be overlooked by ‘real’ historians but they are a wealth of knowledge and now our little secret.

Around the time of the Thirty Years War, the early 1700’s, literacy in Germany was supposedly 2% to 4% of the population, without taking into consideration the difference between those who read regularly and those who could read at all. The reported literates were either of a high standing or involved in the church. More Protestants were known to be able to read than Catholics. Yes, there were those women who were learned but the majority of these were men. And some of these people felt the need to write their memoirs.

A local hero from the town of Uehlfeld in Franconia, Veit von Berg was a young Protestant pastor who was in the city of Neustadt an der Aisch when it was sacked in July 1632. After the war, in 1648, he was commissioned to serve the Evangelical parish in Uehlfeld. Thirty-five people survived the horrors that left this village in ash and rubble, a village that once had population of over 600. Veit von Berg spent his free time rebuilding Uehlfeld, teaching the savaged farmers how to sow seed and live life and writing his autobiography. This is a touching, explicit, insightful story of his fight to live through an unjust war.

A more famous story is Simplicius Simplicissimus by Grimmelshausen, considered to be the first German novel. It is the story of a peasant boy torn away from his family by marauding mercenaries. We follow him from the abduction, to the life with a hermit, to military service, to wealth and excess back to the life of a hermit. The adventures he experienced are considered to be the autobiographical account of Grimmelshausen’s life.

In 1988, Jan Peters, a German historian, found a hand-written document in the Berliner Staatsbibliotek, the Berlin Library. Peters set out to decipher the writings and search for the author, whose name is nowhere in the writings to be found. After much detective work, the writer is believed to the mercenary soldier, Peter Hagendorf. Hagendorf recorded his 25-year career as a mercenary and the 22,500 km travels that took him from Italy to Germany, to the Spanish Netherlands and France. He also took part in the famous Sack of Magdeburg in 1631.

Now, most of my reference books are in German and most of them are written by men. But I want to recreate this time period for an English-speaking audience and keep the language contemporary. I want to get close to the characters, inside their heads, and I also want to do this from the viewpoint of a woman. And I want to stay true to the events documented in my sources.

American historian, Joel Harrington, http://as.vanderbilt.edu/history/bio/joel-harrington professor at the Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, specializes in the Early Modern Period in Germany and has written numerous books concerning this time period in the English language. In 2009, he published The Unwanted Child: The Fate of Foundlings, Orphans, and Juvenile Criminals in Early Modern Germany (University of Chicago Press, 2009). Harrington studies the situation of abandoned children in Nuremberg, Germany, their mothers and the role society played in all of this in the early modern world.

Over the years, the more information I searched for, the more I found. This is only a small outtake from all the sources I have collected. For me, the love of research equals the love of writing historical fiction. And as I reconstruct the Thirty Years War, these books and documents are as instrumental to my writing as my computer and a pad and paper. The stage is set and I can bring in the actors and raise the curtain.

 

 

 

 

#RRBC ’s “SPOTLIGHT” Author Blog Tour @_MarlenaSmith_

Today I’d like to welcome Marlene Smith on the last day of her Spotlight Blog Tour:

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A final hello!

Welcome to Day 7 of my RRBC “SPOTLIGHT” Author Blog Tour! This tour has been an absolute blast, a wonderful experience. I hope you have enjoyed it as much as I have! A huge THANKS to RRBC, my host, and all of those that have joined us along the way.

Since today is the final day of my tour, I would like to take this opportunity to shine the light elsewhere.

If you have been following along my blog tour, you know that writing has always been a big part of my life. Words have been my passion from a very young age. It has been in the recent years that I decided to take my writing to the next level.

The biggest step came in February, 2014. Only a short time after RAVE REVIEWS BOOK CLUB was formed, I was invited to take on the role as Secretary. I had already developed a Twitter-ship with Nonnie Jules, the President of RRBC. With her encouragement (and impossible-to-refuse offer), I accepted the “job.” Little did I know then that I would gain a new family.

Trust me when I say that this is a one-of-a-kind organization. The members are incredible! The Board is amazing! And there’s a great deal that goes on behind the scenes… time, hard work, sweat, and tears. Our hearts go into this club, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

During my time in this book club, I have received the most incredible support and encouragement for my writing. Because of that support, I finally put my words out there. In December, the same year as that first step, I became a published Author in RAVE SOUP FOR THE WRITER’S SOUL Anthology. (RRBC’s members made this book. It’s incredible and a must read!) Three poems are in this book… poems where I spill my heart, where I offer encouragement, where I speak my words.

Fast forward a couple of years… I now have the most wonderful family in RRBC, and I’m not just referring to the Governing Board. Yes, the Board is a family on its own and I absolutely adore my Board Family, BUT, this book club is such a big part of my life, such an important part of my life, that they can’t be anything but family. RRBC is the most supportive, most encouraging, most awesome-tastic family in the world!

With all of that being said, I owe many, many thanks to the people of RAVE REVIEWS BOOK CLUB, including this blog tour. Seriously… being selected as a “SPOTLIGHT” Author is a HUGE honor and I am beyond touched for the opportunity.

Even more than that, I owe thanks to Nonnie Jules, for she’s the reason I took that first initial step. I firmly believe that she’s the reason I am now a published author. She was the push I needed when I didn’t know I needed a push.

Since that first step in December, 2014, my life has been forever changed. I owe a lot to this woman because she has been my mentor, my friend, my “other mother.” She inspires me daily, makes me want to be a better person, and encourages me like no other. I am truly blessed to have her in my life and I could never find the proper words, or enough words, to show her the appreciation that she so deserves.

Thank you to my RRBC family. I adore each of you, more than you know.

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Book Blurb:

All she wanted was a fresh start.

Eight months ago, Scarlet made the choice to leave the prison she called home, and to escape the man that put her there. She had made a new home for herself in the small town of Belmont, Montana. The abandoned apartment was far from luxury, but she was better off, away from her past life.

She never expected to meet Lucas, the local hero and town’s only doctor. She didn’t expect to enjoy the small town life. She didn’t expect her past to catch up to her.

Will she risk it all? Risk revealing her secrets at a chance of love? Will she be forced back into the life she hated? Will she gain control of her own destiny?

Available Spring 2017!!

Author Bio:

Author Marlena Smith is a true Southern Belle at heart. Her home has always been in Alabama and she couldn’t imagine living anywhere else. Growing up as a preacher’s daughter, faith and family played a large part in her life.

Her earliest memory of writing was that of 2nd grade when she was selected to attend the Young Author’s Conference in her home state. Little did she know then that her future was being mapped out.

Today, Marlena is an Author, Freelancer, Book Reviewer, Researcher and Secretary of Rave Reviews Book Club. She may wear many hats, but her passion remains with writing. That’s where her heart is and that’s where she feels she belongs. She has several works in progress, including an upcoming short romance, THE POWER OF LOVE, expected to be out in Spring 2017.

Until then, you can check out some of Marlena’s writing in the RAVE SOUP FOR THE WRITER’S SOUL ANTHOLOGY, available on Amazon.

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Find Marlena online:

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The Soldier’s Return #historicalfiction

Laura Libricz, Authoress

The Soldier’s Return

Book 2 in the Heaven’s Pond Trilogy

Germany, 1626

A senseless war rips through parts of Germany. Ongoing animosity between the Catholics and the Protestants has turned into an excuse to destroy much of the landscape in the territories situated between France, Italy and Denmark. But reliSoldiersReturn 700kgion only plays a minor role in this very lucrative business of war. What better way to wage war than with underpaid, starving, sick, desperate mercenary soldiers?

Direct in the path of these marauding mercenaries lies the once-idyllic farm called Sichardtshof. The master and the maid have lived here the last ten years in a semblance of peace but teetering on the edge of destruction. The attacks are more frequent and the soldiers are more brutal than before. With the soldiers come disease, the plague. And Franconia has found scapegoats to blame for all this misfortune. Witch hunts and executions…

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The Georgian Washing Day

This wonderful post comes from Pen and Pension, the blog of William Savage. Will writes historical mystery novels, set in Norfolk between 1760 and 1800. His first in this series, “An Unlamented Death”, appeared in January 2015. The second book, “The Fabric of Murder”  was published in May 2015. The third installment, “The Code for Killing”, will be published on 25th January, 2016.

Pen and Pension

17th century washing drying laundryAs I noted in a recent posting, one of the myths that goes the rounds is that everyone in the past was always dirty. It isn’t true. The wealthy weren’t, the poor almost certainly were. As I pointed out there, the costs associated with keeping yourself clean were considerable, both in money and time. In a society in which cleanliness and class mirrored each other, keeping not just your body but your clothing and linens clean was straightforward for the rich, a matter of continual care and concern for the middling sort, and probably a hopeless dream for most of the poor.

Don’t misunderstand me. No one in the eighteenth century could hope to match current personal hygiene standards. The means to do so were not available, not would it have been considered necessary. But within what was possible, most people above the very lowest income levels did what…

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