Tag Archives: #electricguitar

Guitar Solos #electricguitar

     
     

     The Creator rested on the seventh day. On the eighth day, he woke up and heard the angels he’d created on the fifth day to keep him company playing on their harps.“Listen guys, this just won’t do. You can’t expect people to want to get into Heaven when they realize they’ll have to listen to that all day.”

     So, on that eighth day, the Creator invented the electric guitar.

     I love guitar solos. And top ten lists. So what better way to end the week than with a top ten list of guitar solos?

     I can identify with singers because I love words and lyrics. And they’re usually the cutest one in the band. I can memorize lyrics and sing a tune, but I can’t make one up. I’m more like a parrot and not really creative with a melody. Even when I was playing the piano, I could only give back the melody as I learned it from sheet music. Which brings me to the conclusion that the singers and the lyrics are the mind of the song. But the guitarist is the heart and the soul.

     I often listen to instrumentals when I’m writing. If I’m trying to think in words, lyrics get in the way. Guitar solos are brainstorming. Or speed on the autobahn, shifting gears and changing lanes. Or rain pounding on the window or snow sliding off the roof.

     I could expand my top ten list to maybe twenty or fifty. If I was talking about my favorite songs of all time I would. But I will only allow myself a top ten list of guitar solos this weekend. Otherwise I would spend all day searching my musical archives. My choices are in no particular order of preference, because I like them all the same. And there are, of course, many more but these come to mind first.

     
1a. 25 or 6 to 4 (the long version)—Chicago / Terry Kath

1b. So We’ve Ended as Lovers—Jeff Beck

       1b2. Goodbye Pork Pie Hat—Jeff Beck

1c. Alive—Pearl Jam

1d. Free Bird (live)—Lynyrd Skynyrd / Allen Collins

1e. Little Wing—from Sting’s band, don’t know who the guitarist is.

1f. Lenny—Stevie Ray Vaughn

1g. Do You Feel Like We Do (live)—Peter Frampton

1h. Eruption—Eddie van Halen

1i. Brighton Rock—Queen—Brian May

1k. Anything played by Jimmy Page.

     I only put Jimmy Page last for effect. He’s my Number One Guitar Player, which opens up new possibilities for other top ten lists!

     If ten people comment with their own top ten list, I’ll be able to compose a Top Hundred List. So your challenge for today is… 

 

Have a nice weekend!

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Headless #mondayblogs #electricguitar

Eddie van Halen-behaving—Photo courtesy of jeffbabicz.com

 

Speaking of Guitars:

      In 1976, furniture designer Ned Steinberger and luthier buddy Stuart Spector got together in Brooklyn, NY and developed a new electric bass called the Spector NS2. The ‘concave / convex’ body form, designed by Ned, became the distinguishing factor for Spector Basses. After that, Ned’s interest in the music industry grew and he pulled out all the stops. He went on to develop some of his more innovative designs. The headless bass was born and the rest is history.
     The unique construction of the Steinberger L-Series headless bass and it’s design made it a real eye-catcher. The neck and body were one solid construction molded out of carbon fibers. The body was then covered with a plastic face plate that also housed the electronics. The neck contained no truss rod, that metal rod inserted in the neck used to adjust the curve of the neck. The curve, or relief, was built into the neck and optimized with the frets. Because there was no headstock, the tuning pegs were incorporated into the bridge and string change was a breeze using the double-ball stings.
     In the early 80’s, Ned got some cheap factory space in Newburgh, NY and moved shop upstate. Shortly thereafter, a six-string guitar version was launched and Ned’s ground-breaking transposing tremolo system, the Trans-Trem. It was at that time, in 1985, that I started working in the fret department. The necks were pre-formed in a machine so that we could install the frets with little or no top-levelling. This procedure for ‘calculating the deflection of carbon graphite necks as they were displaced by the cumulative effects of installed fret pressure’ was developed by Ned and Jeff Babicz.
     Other new models were released. I transferred into the assembly department and worked on the P-Series project: molded necks bolted onto wooden bodies. Guitarist Mike Rutherford of Genesis inspired the M-Series, a molded neck bolted to a more-traditionally shaped body, built by English luthier Roger Giffin.
     Steinberger never officially endorsed artists. The artists just played the instruments. At this time names like Eddie Van Halen, Rick Derringer, Geddy Lee and many others were touring with their Steinberger guitars and basses.
     But, alas, every story has an ending. On my last day, in the summer of 1987, the big blond guy from Gibson came by and bought the company. At that point, the NY company was producing over 25 guitars and basses a week. Eventually, the NY factory was dismantled and the operation was moved to Nashville. 

Here’s some links for more infos:

Ed Roman’s story: Ed Roman’s Steinberger Story 
Jeff’s Website: JeffBabicz.com