Discover #RRBC author Laura Libricz in this interview with @DianneAscroft @HFVBT THE SOLDIER’S RETURN blog tour

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Today, I’m over at Dianne Ascroft’s blog for an interview! Read more here:

Today I’ve invited Laura Libricz, author of The Soldier’s Return, the second book in the Heaven’s Pond trilogy to Ascroft, eh? to tell us about her latest novel.

Welcome Laura.

Thank you so much for having me over today, Dianne!

Let’s get started, shall we?

Tell us about your novel.

LL: The Heaven’s Pond Series is a three-part historical series set in Franconia, Germany, in the early 17thThe Soldier's Return covercentury during the Thirty Years War. These are the novels I have always wanted to read. Written in English and taking the German viewpoint of the war, the story is told by a young maid, a patrician, a Jesuit priest and a young Dutchman. The Master and the Maid is the first book in the series and begins the story in 1616. It’s about a young woman who loses her home, her job and her freedom. Harboring…

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#NewContest “What is the Gender of this Author?” Submit a #ShortStory of 500 hundred words or less … in ANY genre.

“Just how perceptive are you?” asks Suzanne Burke. It’s been quite a while since she came up with a contest here, and she does hope this one proves to be both challenging and entertaining. Continue reading here:

 

Welcome to the World of Suzanne Burke.

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You all know by now just how much pleasure I get from supporting my fellow authors.

It’s been quite a while since I came up with a contest here, and I do hope this one proves to be both challenging and entertaining.

I think it will be interesting for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is discovering just how diversely readers interpret what they read.

Just how perceptive are you?

So … what is this contest about?

The contest works in two parts.

 PART 1. I need authors to contribute a previously unpublished short story of 500 words or less in any genre of their choice.  Please include the title … and for my information and judging purposes only your name and indentifying gender.

Your short story will only be identified to the readers by a number allocated by myself. Your gender will not be…

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How to cope with #cancer #treatment : @BlueHeronBW author Fanny Barry’s new release

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Today I’d like to welcome Blue Heron Book Works author Fanny Barry to talk about her re-release of I Wish I Knew:

Fanny: “So proud that my I Wish I Knew books for breast cancer patients, family, and friends have been republished! Nearly 15 years after the event, they are all together and in color, and available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0999146025 

“So blessed to still be here with them with the hope that they help others.
Thank you Blue Heron Book Works and my cousin and graphic designer extraordinaire Megan for making this happen. They could be the best thing I have done! But who knows, I am not done yet!”

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Fanny Barry’s trilogy, I Wish I Knew…Notes from a Breast Cancer Survivor is now in one full-color volume. Fanny gives wise and witty advice on coping with treatment, how to help friends who are undergoing treatment, and how to make sense of who you’ve become after undergoing cancer treatments.

About the author: Fanny Barry, a native of Boston, Massachusetts, is a writer, artist, engineer, and yoga teacher who wrote the I Wish I Knew books as part of her recovery process from breast cancer. She moved to Tulum, Mexico shortly after surviving cancer where she re-built her life from the ground up, literally. She recently published her memoir about her adventures in survival called Map of Life and Beauty. She manages a yoga studio and shalla in Tulum, Mexico called Tribal tribaltulum.com. She blogs at her website thatbarrygirl.com.

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Discover “Songs of Ourselves” #memoir #anthology A Great Read @BlueHeronBW

“Songs of Ourselves is a real trip into and across Americana. If you haven’t read it, I compare it to about two dozen Blue Highways wrapped into one volume.”

Online Home of Susan Feathers

In 2015, Blue Heron Book Works published a collections of blog posts, journal entries, and other writing forms from writers across the nation. Bathseba Monk, the intrepid and visionary editor of Blue Heron Book Works, and her editor Mary Lawlor, put together a book of American voices as varied as the landscape between our coastlines.

Songs of Ourselves is a real trip into and across Americana. If you haven’t read it, I compare it to about two dozen Blue Highways wrapped into one volume.

Listen to Tomas Benitez: Quietude in the Gully. No moaning animals or ruckus. It’s as if the Pomona Freeway Ocean knows and slows to a steady heartbeat rhythm. The waves rumble with a distant peace. La Luna is framed by the dark outline of the palm fronds on the left, the Yucca tree on the right seems to be reaching up like a hand holding…

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Read LuAnn’s #review for #histfic novel THE SOLDIER’S RETURN @KentuckyGal @HFVBT

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Today I’d like to welcome LuAnn Braley and share her wonderful review of THE SOLDIER’S RETURN! Please take the time to visit her at Back Porchervations.

LuAnn’s Review:

The second book in Laura Libricz’s “Heaven’s Pond Trilogy”, The Soldier’s Return, pulls no punches when it comes to describing some of the more horrifying aspects of war in the early 1600s.  Granted, there were no air strikes or nukes, but plenty of damage was done to the countryside and the people living there nonetheless.

The whole Catholic vs Protestant issue was cooking on high heat and littlle bits of land would go back and forth from the control of one religion to the control of another.  And wo to the Catholic who found herself in a Protestant village, and vice versa.  It was as bad back then as it is these days between gangs in many areas.  And interactions could be just as deadly.

And Ralf, the Jesuit whom I grew to dislike intensely in the first book of the trilogy, The Master and the Maid, doubled down on his fanaticism when it came to ferreting out ‘witches’, which a rather disproportionate amount of the time were Protestant sympathizers.  If the suspect in question did not give an answer that Ralf wanted, he would apply various ‘methods of persuasion’ to ‘drive the devil out’ of said person.  I remember a vivid description of thumb screws…and he just got nasty from there.

Herr Tucher and Katarina (the titular master and maid of the first book) were still at Sichardtshof farm, trying to hold things together for the little group of people living and working there.  Not an easy job when army after army comes through.  In those times, the soldiers were not paid their promised wages very often, and scant if any rations were provided, so they took what they wanted from farmers and villagers – food, drink and women.  I am glad the author did not resort to the crass terminology that seems to be prevalent in some modern erotic romances, but the scenes are quite disturbing nonetheless.  That is not a criticixm, but an observation.

Pieter had gone back to Amsterdam shortly before his father passed away, ran into all kinds of trouble shortly after and after a stint in jail in the Spice Islands, returned but had to leave town fairly quickly again.  He wanted to go back to the farm (probably the closest thing to family he had left), and joined up with various military units on the way south to Sichardtshof.  He changed units as often as needed to suit his purposes.  Unfortunately, he did not resign or ask for re-assignment first…which tends to upset the commanders of said units.  Deserters faired no better, and probably much worse, than they do today.

Reading the book, which was difficult to stop, I felt like I was there – slogging through mud, feeling fear for the women and children on the farm when soldiers and ‘camp followers’ marauded through.

I do wonder about the title, a wee bit.  The story seemed to have as much or more to do with the goings on at Sichardtshof itself, than with Pieter’s return to the farm.  For me it’s one of those ‘it would be interesting to know someday’, but had no bearing on my enjoyment of the book.

The Soldier’s Return is not always an easy read.  Don’t get me wrong, the story is wonderful … but life for the people living in that area and at that time was not..  There was not a ‘HEA’ ending, but the core group of characters (Tucher, Katarina, Isobel, her father and Pieter) were still standing.  If you are a reader, The Soldier’s Return is a satisfying, filling read.

And now I’m really looking forward to the last installment of the trilogy, Ash and Rubble, to see how Isobel fulfills the White Witch’s predictions for her!

Join me on this stop of my @HFVBT #book tour for the latest review of #histfic The Soldier’s Return

Please join me today in welcoming Rachael from Rachael’s Ramblings for this wonderful review!

“One thing I felt Laura Libricz did superlatively was create a gritty sense of realism. This is war and religion at their least glorious; there are no great victories or dashing heroes to be found here. Throughout the novel she explores how very low mankind can sink in its darkest times and how brutal people can be with very little provocation, especially to people they consider ‘other’.”

Continue reading here:

Rachael's Ramblings

This was meant to be up much earlier in the week, but life got somewhat in the way! I was kindly sent this book by Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours.

The Soldier’s Return by Laura Libricz

Publication Date: September 15, 2017
eBook & Paperback

Series: Heaven’s Pond Trilogy, Book Two
Genre: Historical Fiction

The year is 1626. A senseless war rips through parts of Germany. Ongoing animosity between the Catholics and the Protestants has turned into an excuse to destroy much of the landscape situated between France, Italy and Denmark. But religion only plays a minor role in this lucrative business of war.

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THE SOLDIER’S RETURN receives 5 stars from @AmyBooksy @HFVBT

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Read the latest review for THE SOLDIER’S RETURN from Locks, Hooks and Books via Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours!

Amy’s Review: 

The Soldier’s Return is the second installment from the intriguing The Heaven’s Pond Trilogy. I enjoyed this one as much as book one, The Master and the Maid. The author masterfully crafted a wonderfully written historical. I felt like I was right there living among the people experiencing the struggles and horrors of the time.

I am anxiously awaiting for the third book from The Heaven’s Pond Trilogy to release and find out where the author takes the reader next.

I highly recommend it.

Five stars.

5STar

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